PETER H. TRAINING

Strength Training Overload Protocols

Resistance Guidelines

 

Strength Training: The Right Way

The goal of the strength training program will be to develop overall muscular strength potentials that is safe, sound, sensible, systematic and applicable to your fitness goals.

 

Begin each set with a goal to complete the number of repetitions listed. The effort must be increasing for every subsequent repetition.

 

 

Each repetition should be performed in a controlled, deliberate manner where the exercise is performed with appropriate level of intensity and with the minimal involvement of momentum.

 

 

You should continually contract your target musculature during the raising phase and the lowering phase of each repetition. 

 

The lowering phase of every repetition should be slower than the raising phase. A suggested guide is to raise the involved limbs up (push or pull) in 2 seconds or at a 2 count and lower (resist) them in 4 seconds or a 4 count.

 

Flex the muscle momentarily in the mid-range of each exercise when the muscle is in its “fully contracted position.” Then lower the resistance slowly to the starting position. This is the most difficult way to train; however it is the most productive way to train.

 

When you are able to complete the exercise in proper form for the prescribed number of repetitions, add the appropriate weight (depending on the difficulty of the exercise) appropriate may be as little as 1 pound, yet not greater than 10 pounds and continue to progress. Never sacrifice quality of lifting form for quantity of weight lifted.

 

Your abdominal muscles are the key to stabilizing your lower back. When your abdominal muscles are relaxed, your back has a tendency to arch. Throughout the pressing movements when lying on your back or seated against a back rest, engage your abdominal muscles by feeling a connection between the lower ribs and the top of your pelvis. Simultaneously feel a connection between your belly button and your spine. To help your abdominal muscles function properly, coordinate your lifting with your breathing. Exhale as you press the weight away from your body, and inhale as you return the weight to the starting position.

If you're muscles are engaged and you still arch your back, you might be lifting too much weight. If the muscles cannot cope with the weight, the other muscles in your lower back kick in to help out. These muscles create the arch in your back. Reduce the weight until you reach an amount that you can lift while maintaining proper form.

For best results, perform each progressive weight training workout 3x a week a “minimum” 60 minutes each day, giving the muscle group trained 1 day rest in between training days. You may stretch before, during and after each exercise and or days off. Cardio may be performed “after” strength training and/or on off days.